Tag Archives: Fuel

New Mexico Department of Agriculture petroleum inspectors help protect consumers at the pump


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Kristie Garcia
Public Affairs Director, New Mexico Department of Agriculture
krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu
575-339-5011

March 18, 2021

New Mexico Department of Agriculture petroleum inspectors help protect consumers at the pump

Petroleum Standards team inspects fuel pumps, fuel quality

Haga clic aquí para la versión en español.

LAS CRUCES – Have you ever been at the fuel pump and noticed the New Mexico Department of Agriculture sticker? That sticker is a sign that the fuel pump has been inspected by a professional from the NMDA Standards and Consumer Services Division. The division performs regulatory activities under the authority of the Petroleum Products Standards Act.

The New Mexico Department of Agriculture Standards and Consumer Services Division performs regulatory activities under the authority of the Petroleum Products Standards Act. As part of these activities, petroleum inspectors test and screen fuel to ensure the octane and ethanol content is correct. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

The NMDA Petroleum Standards program is responsible for the annual inspection and testing of all commercial petroleum measuring devices used in the state. This program ensures product quality for gasoline, diesel, kerosene, brake fluid, antifreeze and lubricating oil, and is responsible for regulating the advertising and labeling of these products. Precise field standards are used in these inspections and are certified through the NMDA Metrology Laboratory.

With fuel costs rising, it’s important for the public to know that NMDA petroleum inspectors are doing their job to protect consumers, as always. Not only do they inspect fuel pumps across the state, but they collect fuel samples, which are analyzed by the NMDA Petroleum Laboratory to ensure customers get what they pay for.

The New Mexico Department of Agriculture Standards and Consumer Services Division performs regulatory activities under the authority of the Petroleum Products Standards Act. As part of these activities, NMDA employees inspect fuel pumps at all gasoline stations in New Mexico once a year on a routine basis. Once the fuel pump is inspected and approved, the appropriate year is marked on the NMDA sticker on the device. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

“Our agency protects petroleum consumers by inspecting fuel pumps at all gasoline stations in New Mexico once a year on a routine basis and whenever we receive a complaint,” said New Mexico Agriculture Secretary Jeff Witte. “The cooperation of the retailers allows our inspectors to continue to do their jobs serving the public, even amidst a pandemic.”

Petroleum inspectors test and screen fuel to ensure the octane and ethanol content is correct.

“We want consumers to be confident that they are receiving a quality product at the pump,” said Witte. “If consumers select premium gasoline, for example, they should get premium gasoline.”

Inspectors also check the safe operation of the pumps for leaks, accuracy, price calculations, and price-sign verification, including special offers, such as cash or loyalty discounts.

(Photo taken pre-pandemic.) The New Mexico Department of Agriculture Standards and Consumer Services Division performs regulatory activities under the authority of the Petroleum Products Standards Act. As part of these activities, petroleum inspectors collect fuel samples, which are analyzed by the NMDA Petroleum Laboratory. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

The NMDA Petroleum Standards team offers these tips and facts:

  • Don’t idle your vehicle while waiting in line.
  • Don’t overfill your tank.
  • Temperature does not matter. The pumps dispense the legally-defined 231 cubic inches of fuel when the pump indicates 1 gallon.
  • Shop around.
  • Drive slower to save on fuel costs.

Consumers may call the NMDA Standards and Consumer Services Division at 575-646-1616 to report an issue related to fuel or a fuel pump.

“Next time you fuel up, be sure to look for the NMDA sticker on the pump,” said Witte.

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