Category Archives: NMDA News and Hot Topics

Officials announce recommendations as result of VSV among NM horses

For immediate release

July 16, 2019
Media Contact:
Kristie Garcia, Public Information Officer,
New Mexico Department of Agriculture
575-646-2804, krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu

State officials announce recommendations as result of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus among New Mexico horses

(Albuquerque, New Mexico) – As fair season approaches, the New Mexico Livestock Board announced several recommendations as a result of confirmed Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) cases in New Mexico horses.

New Mexico State Veterinarian Dr. Ralph Zimmerman urges people to be diligent.

“While we are not ordering the cancellation of any events at this point, we recommend several advisable steps to keep animals safe,” said Zimmerman. “I encourage common sense decision making and overall awareness of the situation.”

Following is a list of recommendations for fair organizers, rodeo organizers and for individuals bringing animals to events:

  • Either an Extension agent, local veterinarian or a knowledgeable livestock person should be present at entry gates to check animals’ mouths for lesions (using fresh gloves for each animal)
  • Questionable animals should be sent home before they enter the grounds
  • The use of fly spray is encouraged
  • Do not handle other people’s animals
  • Avoid sharing grooming equipment
  • Use your own water buckets
  • If an animal breaks with Vesicular Stomatitis on the grounds, send them home immediately

At this point, state officials are not requiring a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection for intrastate travel.

VSV cases have been confirmed in Valencia, Sandoval, Los Alamos and Santa Fe Counties thus far.

The virus can affect horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine, camelids (alpacas and llamas) and cervids (deer species). Symptoms may include oral lesions, oral blistering and drooling, but please refer to the New Mexico Livestock Board website for more detailed information: https://www.nmlbonline.com/news.

Please be sure to contact your veterinarian if you plan to travel from New Mexico to other states with horses or other livestock. This disease is reportable in New Mexico, meaning animal owners are required to notify USDA or the state veterinarian if your veterinarian suspects VSV.

If you suspect Vesicular Stomatitis Virus, please contact the New Mexico State Veterinarian Dr. Ralph Zimmerman at 505-841-6161 or USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)/USDA-Veterinary Services (VS) at 505-313-8050.

“Vesicular Disease Lesion 1” Cutline: Symptoms of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus may include oral lesions, oral blistering and drooling. A lesion is visible on the mouth of this horse in New Mexico. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Livestock Board)
Symptoms of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus may include oral lesions, oral blistering and drooling. A lesion is visible on the mouth of this horse in New Mexico. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Livestock Board)
Symptoms of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus may include oral lesions, oral blistering and drooling. Blistering is visible on the gums of this horse in New Mexico. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Livestock Board)
Symptoms of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus may include oral lesions, oral blistering and drooling. Blistering is visible on the gums of this horse in New Mexico. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Livestock Board)

– NMLB –

Register by July 15 for Americas Food and Beverage Show & Conference in Miami Sept. 23-24

If you own a New Mexico food and/or beverage company, don’t miss this opportunity to expand your market! Register by July 15 for the 23rd Americas Food and Beverage Show & Conference Sept. 23-24 in Miami Beach, Florida.

Qualifying products include: Natural or processed food and beverages containing fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, culinary herbs, spices and horticulture as defined by USDA as a “specialty crop.” Products must be 50% or greater New Mexico-grown and/or processed.

The New Mexico Department of Agriculture is facilitating participation of New Mexico businesses in the event, which attracts national and international buyers. This is an excellent show for both established and new-to-market companies in the food service industry.

Benefits include:

  • Expanding your sales into the food service sector
  • Exposure to domestic and international buyers from around the world
  • Witnessing the latest regional trends from the food and beverage industry
  • A prime location in the USA Pavilion

The booth fee is $500 for a 10×10 space, and only three spaces are available for New Mexico companies. Companies are limited to one booth. Additional booth space and special accommodations may be considered on a case-by-case basis, depending on availability.

Booth package includes:

  • Pavilion booth design and construction
  • Open concept
  • Carpeting
  • Fascia board
  • Lighting
  • Electricity
  • One lockable reception counter
  • Meeting tables with chairs
  • Hand sanitation
  • Daily booth cleaning
  • Two exhibitor passes

Exhibitors are responsible for airfare, ground transportation, lodging, meals, incidental expenses, food/beverage sampling, marketing materials, freight/drayage/storage of sample product, any special food preparation/refrigeration equipment and appliances, and required utility expenses.

To register, contact NMDA marketing specialist Jason New at jnew@nmda.nmsu.edu. The event is made possible by the USDA’s Specialty Crop Block Grant Program and the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. For more information about the event, visit www.americasfoodandbeverage.com.

A bird's eye view is shown of a food show. There are several aisles set-up with many food items and brands positioned in front and around the stands. Many people are gathered around each booth.

New Mexico hemp growers must obtain license from NMDA

May 2, 2019
Media Contact:
Kristie Garcia, Public Information Officer,
New Mexico Department of Agriculture
575-646-2804, krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu

New Mexico hemp growers must obtain license from NMDA

It is illegal to grow hemp without a license in New Mexico

(Las Cruces, New Mexico) – New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte would like to remind the public that all hemp growers in New Mexico must obtain a license from the New Mexico Department of Agriculture.

State and federal laws require oversight of hemp production to ensure cannabis plants grown meet the state and federal definition of hemp. In New Mexico, both the individual grower and the growing location must be registered with NMDA.

Interested individuals may download a hemp production application at www.nmda.nmsu.edu. For more information, call NMDA at 575-646-3207 or email hemp@nmda.nmsu.edu.

– NMDA –

Census of Agriculture data reveals young farmers, farmers with military service play key role in New Mexico

For immediate release
April 18, 2019

United States Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service
New Mexico Field Office
Media Contact: Longino Bustillos, State Statistician
575-522-6023, longino.bustillos@nass.usda.gov

New Mexico Department of AgricultureMedia Contact: Kristie Garcia, Public Information Officer
575-646-2804, krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu

Newly released Census of Agriculture data reveals young farmers and farmers with military service play key role in New Mexico
New Mexico’s percentage of farmers and ranchers with military service was higher than national average

(Las Cruces, New Mexico) – Newly released data from the 2017 Census of Agriculture features new tables indicating the relevance of young producers, beginning farmers and ranchers, and producers with military service in New Mexico.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the Census data last week.

Young producers are those age 35 years or younger, while beginning farmers and ranchers are those with 10 years or fewer on any farm. USDA defines a farm as “any place that produced and sold, or normally would have sold, $1,000 or more of agricultural products during the Census year.” The definition of “farms” includes farms, ranches, nurseries and greenhouses.

New Mexico is one of the few states in which the number of farms continues to increase, and New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said female producers play an important role in the state’s family farms.

“We had 15,170 farms in 2002, and that number grew to 25,044 in 2017,” said Witte. “And female producers accounted for 41% of our producers in New Mexico in 2017.”

The state also had 10,628 new and beginning producers, which was 26% of the state’s total number of producers (40,850).

“Within the 26% of farmers who consider themselves new or beginning farmers, the average age is 50.1, which tells us that New Mexicans are returning to farming from other careers,” Witte said. “This once again proves that New Mexico has a strong culture in ag and that our people have a strong desire to grow and continue to provide food for their families.”

Witte said it is important to see the number of young producers increase, especially due to the high average age of producers in the state. New Mexico has the second highest average age of producers in the U.S. at 59.8, second only to Hawaii. In 2017, the Land of Enchantment had 2,848 young producers, which was approximately 7% of the state’s total number of producers.

“We need to continue to engage our youth and keep them interested in the agriculture industry,” said Witte. “Whether it’s farming, technology, ranching or the value-added industry, there are many opportunities in New Mexico.”

NASS New Mexico State Statistician Longino Bustillos said the USDA made a shift in the way it counts the number of producers farming or ranching, which affected the age and the number of female producers in 2017.

“The number of female producers and age demographic was calculated by allowing up to four producers at each operation to report, and taking the average age of those individuals,” Bustillos said. “This more accurately reflects the average age and the number of female producers making decisions on the farm. Because of the new method, USDA calculates the average age of producers from the 2012 Census at 58.3 in New Mexico, as opposed to 60.5, which was the average age determined when we only requested the age of the main operator.”

In addition to female producers, young producers and beginning producers, New Mexico saw a shift in farmers and ranchers with military service. That number totaled 5,366, which was 13% of New Mexico’s total and was higher than the national average of 11%.

However, an area of needed improvement for New Mexico is its internet access among farms. Only 60% of farms in New Mexico have internet access. New Mexico continues to lag behind the national average in farms with internet access, which is 75%. Internet access in New Mexico only increased by 4% from the 2012 Census of Agriculture.

Bustillos reiterated the importance of responding to the Census.

“The Census gives voice and opportunity to all farmers and ranchers to tell the changing story of agriculture over the years and identify emerging trends and needs,” said Bustillos. “We thank each and every person who took the time to respond.”

Response to the 2017 Census of Agriculture in New Mexico was 72.2%, which exceeded the national average response rate of 71.5.

NASS is pleased to share first-time data on topics such as military status and on-farm decision making. To make it easier to find data of your interest, results are available in many online formats including a new data query interface, as well as traditional data tables. All Census of Agriculture information is available at www.nass.usda.gov/AgCensus.

– 30 –

Japan & Europe Specialty Food & Beverage Inbound Trade Missions set for Oct. 21-22 in New Mexico

Are you in the business of New Mexico craft beer, spirits, wine or ciders? European and Japan buyers will visit New Mexico Oct. 21-22 for Specialty Food & Beverage Inbound Trade Missions. Registration deadline is Sept. 26. Visit the Western United States Agricultural Trade Association website at https://www.wusata.org/event/ for details or to register.

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