• Rangeland and Grazing Issues

    NM green crops and water ditches

    Federal Grazing Lands

    Range and forest lands constitute a significant portion of New Mexico’s 78 million-acre land base.  Federal agencies control approximately 34 percent of the land mass of New Mexico.  State trust and private land intermingle with federal land, resulting in a mosaic of ownership that complicates rangeland management.  A single ranch often contains private, state trust, and federal land-each with their own set of requirements, leases, permits, and administrators.  Non-private grazing lands, public rangeland laws and regulations, and executive and judicial orders and decisions affect the livestock industry.  These have transformed the regulatory environment in which livestock producers operate, affecting the stability of New Mexico’s livestock industry.

    NMDA cooperates with ranchers, federal, state , and local agencies, and other stakeholders  to address problems that occur due to federal laws.  The goal is to develop  appropriate grazing strategies  to protect the range while meeting the needs of the rancher.  When drought, wildfire, or competition between wildlife and livestock temporarily reduces the forage available for consumption,  livestock and wildlife numbers may need to be adjusted to allow the range to recover.

    Defining the appropriate stewardship level requires cooperation by the rancher and perhaps several state and federal agencies.  NMDA maintains a liaison with appropriate individuals and government agencies.  This enhances understanding and cooperation regarding mutual opportunities and challenges related to rangeland management in New Mexico.

    The Public Rangelands Improvement Act requires federal agencies to consult, cooperate, and coordinate with grazing permittees and the state to develop allotment (range) management plans.  NMDA provides technical expertise during this process.

     

    Farm and Range Improvement Fund (FRIF)

    NMDA works with county commissioners to expend funds derived from the state’s share of Taylor Grazing Act fees paid to U.S. Bureau of Land Management.  These funds are returned to the state and distributed to the originating counties.  The law defines six purposes for the funds relating to conservation of resources and infrastructure, which affect the livestock industry directly.  NMDA provides a liaison between the director/secretary, appointed FRIF representatives in the counties and county commissioners.

    land

     

    FY18 FRIF Expenditure Report

    Rangeland Protection Act

    Noxious weeds information

  • Over 50 people attended Binational Livestock Meeting hosted by NMDA

    For immediate release

    April 20, 2018
    Media Contact:
    Kristie Garcia, Public Information Officer, New Mexico Department of Agriculture
    575-646-2804, krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu

    Over 50 people attended Binational Livestock Meeting
    hosted by New Mexico Department of Agriculture last week

    LAS CRUCES, NEW MEXICO) – The New Mexico Department of Agriculture hosted the Second Annual Binational Livestock Meeting in Las Cruces April 13-14.

    The purpose of the meeting is to improve and benefit the livestock industry by sharing experiences and strengthening relationships with New Mexico’s counterparts in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. Last year’s inaugural meeting was held in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

    “The binational meeting provided a great opportunity to showcase New Mexico livestock and dairy quality, and it allowed us to continue to build on an already strong partnership with our neighbors from Mexico,” said New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte. “Our producers share many of the same challenges and opportunities and enjoy working together to benefit producers from New Mexico, Arizona and Sonora. As a region, we are stronger together.”

    The meeting began Friday morning at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum with speakers and a roundtable discussion. Witte spoke at the meeting, along with New Mexico Cattle Growers Association President Tom Sidwell, Sonora Department of Agriculture Secretary M.S. Julio Cesar Corona Valenzuela, Secretary of Unión Ganadera Regional de Sonora Lic. Rubén Molina Molina and Dr. Peter Mundschenk of Arizona Department of Agriculture.

    Meeting attendees were then taken to the New Mexico State University Chihuahuan Desert Rangeland Research Center north of Las Cruces, where they learned about cattle nutrition, reproduction and the latest technology in rangeland management. The following NMSU faculty, staff and students spoke to attendees:
    • Shanna Ivey, NMSU Animal and Range Sciences and Extension Animal Science and Natural Resources Interim Department Head
    • Natalie Goldberg, NMSU Agricultural Experiment Station Interim Director and Associate Dean
    • Andrew Cox, NMSU CDRRC Manager
    • Shelemia Nyamuryekung’e, NMSU Range Science Graduate Student
    • Matthew McIntosh, NMSU Range Science Graduate Student
    • Derek Bailey, NMSU Animal and Range Sciences Professor and Rangeland Scientist
    • Eric Scholljegerdes, NMSU Ruminant Nutritionist
    • Craig Gifford, NMSU Beef Cattle Extension Specialist
    • Dr. John Wenzel, NMSU Extension Veterinarian

    The meeting concluded Saturday, April 14, when attendees learned about the dairy industry in New Mexico. Robert Hagevoort with NMSU Dairy Extension gave a presentation, the attendees toured F&A Dairy, and they visited a Big Sky Dairy Farm.
    For more information about the Binational Livestock Meeting, please contact Juan Sanchez, NMDA Marketing Specialist, 575-646-7090, jsanchez@nmda.nmsu.edu

    – NMDA –

     

    Over 50 individuals attended the Second Annual Binational Livestock Meeting hosted by New Mexico Department of Agriculture April 13-14. The event began with a meeting at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum. (NMDA photo by Pamela Sanchez)

  • Agricultural Programs & Resources Statutes & Rules

    NATURAL RESOURCES

    Noxious Weed Control Act Chapter 76, Article 7, 1-22 NMSA
    Noxious Weed Act of 1963 Chapter 76, Article 7, 22-30 NMSA
    Noxious Weed Management Act Chapter 76, Article 7D NMSA
    Rangeland Protection Act Chapter 76, Article 7B NMSA
    Range Management Plans Chapter 76, Article 7C NMSA
    Taylor Grazing Act Funds, distribution Chapter 6, Article 11, 5 NMSA
    Farm and Range Improvement Fund Chapter 6, Article 11, 6 NMSA
    Predatory Wild Animals and Rodent Pests Chapter 77, Article 15, 1-5 NMSA
    Acequia and Community Ditch Fund Act Chapter 73, Article 2A, 1-3 NMSA
    Ditches to which applicable Chapter 73, Article 2, 27 NMSA
    Watershed District Act Chapter 73, Article 20, 1-24 NMSA
    Soil and Water Conservation District Act Chapter 73, Article 20, 25-48 NMSA
    Conducting an Election of District Supervisors Title 21, Chapter 9, Part 2 NMAC
    Conducting a Referendum Title 21, Chapter 9, Part 3 NMAC

     

    For questions contact:
    Julie Maitland
    Division Director
    New Mexico Department of Agriculture
    JMaitland@nmda.nmsu.edu
  • Statutes and Rules

    The New Mexico Department of Agriculture is responsible for the administration of over 30 state statutes and the rules and regulations promulgated under them. The statutes and rules made available here are for the public’s convenience and are meant to be used only as a reference. The department has made every effort to accurately reproduce these statutes here but they are not the official statutes of the state. The official statutes are made available on the Internet on the New Mexico Compilation Commission website. The official rules are available at the New Mexico Administrative Code website. If there are any discrepancies between versions provided here and the official version, the official version rules.

    NEW RULE

    Pecan Weevil Interior Quarantine 21.17.36 NMAC

    As a result of the recent pecan weevil findings, the New Mexico Department of Agriculture has implemented a sixty-day quarantine effective January 27, 2017. To limit the spread of pecan weevil from infested residential trees to commercial orchards, movement of pecans produced within the city limits of Clovis, Roswell, Hobbs, and Artesia are restricted.

    Specifics regarding the certification of pecan nuts can be found within the quarantine rule. Information is also available at the affected area’s County Cooperative Extension Offices.  Residential and commercial pecan tree owners should be on the lookout for pecans with round, BB-sized holes in the shells, or legless, white grubs inside the pecan nut. If you suspect you have pecan weevil in your residential pecan trees, contact your local County Cooperative Extension Office.

    APIARIES

    Bee Act  Chapter 76, Article 9
    Commercial Apiaries  21.27.2 NMAC

    CHILE LABELING

    New Mexico Chile Advertising Act Chapter 25, Article 11
    New Mexico Chile Verification and Record Requirements 21.16.7 NMAC

    DAIRY

    Dairy Act   Chapter 25, Article 7
    Dairy Product Act  Chapter 25, Article 7A
    Dairy Establishment Sanitation Act  Chapter 26, Article 7B
    Pasturized Milk Ordinance  21.34.3 NMAC
    Administrative Penalties under Dairy Act  21.34.14 NMAC
    Animal Drug Residue Enforcement Procedures  21.34.4 NMAC
    Open Date Labeling for Dairy Products 21.34.5 NMAC
    Standards of Identity for Frozen Desserts 21.34.6 NMAC
    Retail Sale of Raw Milk  21.34.2 NMAC

    EGGS

    Egg Grading Act Administrative Penalties  21.34.13 NMAC
    Grades and Standards for Shell Eggs and Reports Covering Information  21.34.8 NMAC
    Egg Inspection Fees  21.34.7 NMAC
    Egg Grading Act 25-6-1 through 16, NMSA 1978

    FEED, SEED & FERTILIZER

    Commercial Feed Act  Chapter 76, Article 19A
    Commercial Feeds  21.18.3 NMAC
    Seed Law  Chapter 76, Article 10
    Seed Standards & Classifications  21.18.4 NMAC
    New Mexico Fertilizer Act  Chapter 76, Article 11
    Fertilizer Products  21.18.2 NMAC

    GENERAL PROVISIONS

    NMDA Rulemaking Procedures  21.1.1 NMAC
    Fees for Documents and Services  21.1.2 NMAC
    Parental Responsibility Act Compliance  21.1.3 NMAC

    MARKETING & PROMOTION

    New Mexico Produce Marketing Act  Chapter 76, Article 15
    New Mexico Commodity Commission Act  Chapter 76, Article 21
    New Mexico Specialty Crops Act  citation unknown
    New Mexico Sheep and Goat Council Act  Chapter 77, Article 8A
    New Mexico Beef Council Act  Chapter 77, Article 2A

    NATURAL RESOURCES

    Noxious Weed Control Act Chapter 76, Article 7, 1-22 NMSA
    Noxious Weed Act of 1963 Chapter 76, Article 7, 22-30 NMSA
    Noxious Weed Management Act Chapter 76, Article 7D NMSA
    Rangeland Protection Act Chapter 76, Article 7B NMSA
    Range Management Plans Chapter 76, Article 7C NMSA
    Taylor Grazing Act Funds, distribution Chapter 6, Article 11, 5 NMSA
    Farm and Range Improvement Fund Chapter 6, Article 11, 6 NMSA
    Predatory Wild Animals and Rodent Pests Chapter 77, Article 15, 1-5 NMSA
    Acequia and Community Ditch Fund Act Chapter 73, Article 2A, 1-3 NMSA
    Ditches to which applicable Chapter 73, Article 2, 27 NMSA
    Watershed District Act Chapter 73, Article 20, 1-24 NMSA
    Soil and Water Conservation District Act Chapter 73, Article 20, 25-48 NMSA
    Conducting an Election of District Supervisors  Title 21, Chapter 9, Part 2 NMAC 
    Conducting a Referendum Title 21, Chapter 9, Part 3 NMAC 

    ORGANICS

    Organic Agriculture 21.15.1 NMAC

    PESTICIDES

    Pesticide Control Act  Chapter 76, Article 4
    Pesticides  21.17.50 NMAC
    Control of Wood Destroying Pests  21.17.51 NMAC
    Continuing Education Units for Pesticide Applicators  21.17.53 NMAC
    Restricted-Use Pesticides  21.17.56 NMAC
    M-44 Capsules and the Livestock Protection Collar  21.17.57 NMAC

    PINON NUTS

    Pinon Nut Act  Chapter 25, Article 10

    PLANT PROTECTION & QUARANTINE

    Pest Control Act  Chapter 76, Article 6
    Plant Protection Act  Chapter 76, Article 6, ¶ 11-28
    Grasshopper and Other Range Pest Control Act  Chapter 76, Article 6, ¶ 2-10
    Cotton Boll Weevil Control Act  Chapter 76, Article 6A
    Harmful Plant Act  Chapter 76, Article 7A
    Pink Bollworm Control Act  Chapter 76, Article 6B
    Plant Nursery Licensing and Inspection  21.17.2 NMAC
    Cotton Pest Emergency Action  21.17.32 NMAC
    Cotton Boll Weevil Quarantine  21.17.42 NMAC
    Pink Bollworm Permanent Plowdown  21.17.31 NMAC
    Japanese Beetle Exterior Quarantine  21.17.27 NMAC
    Pecan Weevil Exterior Quarantine  21.17.28 NMAC
    Pepper Weevil Interior Quarantine and Plow-down  21.17.29 NMAC
    Red Imported Fire Ant Interior Quarantine  21.17.33 NMAC

    WEIGHMASTERS

    Weighmaster Act  Chapter 57, Article 18
    Weighmaster Act Administrative Penalties  21.16.12 NMAC
    Weighmaster Bonding Requirements  21.16.9 NMAC

    • Weighmaster Act, Registration Requirements
    • Weighmaster Act, Weight Certificate Requirements
    • Weighmaster Act, Bonding Requirements

    WEIGHTS & MEASURES – Consumer Services

    Weights and Measures Law  Chapter 57, Article 17
    Weights & Measures Law Administrative Penalties  21.16.11 NMAC
    Specifications, Tolerances and Other Technical Requirements for Commercial Weighing and Measuring Devices  21.16.2 NMAC
    Not Sealed Not Legal for Trade Under the Weights and Measures Law  21.16.3 NMAC
    Bonding and Registration of Services Technicians and Services Establishments for Commercial Weighing or Measuring Devices  21.16.5 NMAC
    Checking the Net Contents of Packaged Goods  21.16.10 NMAC
    Price Representations  21.16.6 NMAC
    Method of Sale of Commodities 21.16.4 NMAC

    • Examination Procedures for Price Verification
    • Price Verification Manual
    • Double-Draft Vehicle Weighing
    • Fees for Weights and Measures Services
    • Full Service Weights and Measures Establishments Registration Requirements
    • Full Service Weights and Measures Establishments Bonding Requirements
    • Regulations on Sale of Fuelwood

    WEIGHTS & MEASURES – Petroleum Standards

    Petroleum Products Standards Act  Chapter 57, Article 19
    Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Technical Requirements for Commercial Weighing and Measuring Devices  19.15.103 NMAC
    Standard Specifications/Modifications for Petroleum Products  19.15.104 NMAC
    Labeling Requirements for Petroleum Products  19.15.105 NMAC
    Octane Posting Requirements  19.15.106 NMAC
    Applying Administrative Penalties  19.15.107 NMAC
    Bonding and Registration of Servicemen and Service Establishments for Commercial Petroleum Weighing or Measuring Devices  19.15.108 NMAC
    Not Sealed Not Legal For Trade  19.15.109 NMAC
    Biodiesel Fuel Specification, Dispensers, and Dispenser Labeling Requirements  19.15.110 NMAC
    E85 Fuel Specification, Dispensers, and Dispenser Labeling Requirements  19.15.111 NMAC
    Retail Natural Gas (CNG/LNG) Regulations 19.15.112 NMAC

    • Security Seals
    • LPG Method of Sale Memo to Owners
    • Biodiesel Mandate Implementation Notice
    • Diversion of Measured Liquid
    • Recommendations for the Storage and Handling of Alcohol-Blended Fuels
    • Petroleum Products Standards Act, Registration Requirements
    • Fees for Petroleum Standards Laboratory Services
    • Petroleum Products Standards Act, Bonding Requirements
    • Biodiesel Labeling Requirements Memo
    • Regulations on LPG and Bulk Meters
    • Height Restrictions for Calibrating Provers
  • Noxious Weed Information

    NM green crops and water ditches

    Invasive species have been cited as the second largest threat to endangered native plant species.  Most noxious species in New Mexico are found on rangelands and wild lands. These  invasions result in decreases in available forage for livestock and wildlife.  The Noxious Weeds Management Act directs NMDA to develop a noxious weed list for the state.  It also identifies methods of control for designated species, and educates the public about noxious weeds.  NMDA coordinates weed management among local, state, and federal land managers as well as private land owners.

    Troublesome Weeds of New Mexico (large file)

    New Mexico Non-Native Phreatophyte/Watershed Management Plan

    Noxious Weed Memo and List (updated October 2016)

    Noxious Weed Control Act

    Noxious Weed Act of 1963

    Noxious Weed Management Act

    ——————————————————————————–

    New Mexico’s Cooperative Weed Management Areas (CWMA)

    CWMAs are a partnership of government agencies, tribes, individuals, and various groups to manage noxious weeds and/or invasive plants.  Many CWMAs provide technical assistance, equipment, and educational opportunities related to noxious weed identification and management.  They are an important resource in New Mexico’s efforts to manage noxious weeds.

    Cooperative Weed Management Areas with contact information (updated April 2017)

    CWMA Fact Sheet

    New Mexico CWMA Map

    ——————————————————————————–

  • Print This Post Print This Post